Patient Assessment

If joint pain disrupts your lifestyle, you need to explore whether or not you are a candidate for joint replacement. It is
important to speak with your family physician or your orthopedic specialist regarding the available treatment options.

Common Patient Considerations for Joint Replacement

Do you experience joint pain several times per week?

  • Yes
  • No

How does joint pain affect you? Track all that apply

Sleep:

  • Cannot perform
  • Very difficult
  • Somewhat difficult
  • No difficulty

Sitting

  • Cannot perform
  • Very difficult
  • Somewhat difficult
  • No difficulty

Getting Dressed:

  • Cannot perform
  • Very difficult
  • Somewhat difficult
  • No difficulty

Climbing stairs:

  • Cannot perform
  • Very difficult
  • Somewhat difficult
  • No difficulty

Ability to work:

  • Cannot perform
  • Very difficult
  • Somewhat difficult
  • No difficulty

Walking

  • Cannot perform
  • Very difficult
  • Somewhat difficult
  • No difficulty

The following list of questions may help your conversation with either your primary care physician or an orthopedic specialist.

  • Does my joint pain indicate arthritis?
  • What are the available treatment options?
  • Should I exercise? If so, how much?
  • Is there anything I can do to minimize my risk for developing osteoarthritis?
  • Does my occupation put me at risk for developing arthritis?
  • What is my target weight?
  • What types of exercise are best?
  • What else can I do to improve the health of my joints?
  • Do I need to see an orthopedic specialist?

Additional resources to learn more about joint health and arthritis:
Arthritis Foundation
(800) 568-4045
Arthritis.org

The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons
(800) 346-2267
Aaos.org

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
(877) 226-426
niams.nih.gov

National Institute on Aging
Nia.nih.gov

Biomet
http://www.biomet.com/patients/